Scam or Legitimate? Here Are The Answers

How well did you do when you tested your knowledge of cyber security in our quiz? Check out the full answers below. 

1. The Microsoft warning – CORRECT ANSWER: SCAM

  • Windows does not contact its customers through pop-up messages. Turning off your computer cannot result in the loss of your data so if you see this message, close your internet browser by clicking CTRL + ALT + DEL on your keyboard and navigating to the Task Manager. 
  • HINT: If you ever see a pop up telling you to call a number, it’s likely a scam.

2. The Google Chrome browser warning – CORRECT ANSWER: LEGITIMATE

  • This is your Internet browser trying to warn you against visiting a dangerous site. If you see this, press the back button right away! It will take you back to your previous page and not redirect you which is a good sign that this is legitimate. 

3. The email from Bank of America – CORRECT ANSWER: SCAM

  • You can verify you is sending you emails by looking at the email address the message was sent from. Postmaster@tevbulten.com is not an email address that Bank of America would contact you from! If you see an email from a suspicious sender like this, delete it.

4. The Facebook login page – CORRECT ANSWER: LEGITIMATE

  • Do you see the yellow lock in the address bar? That’s the website’s security certificate. You can click on it for more details. Once you know the site is secure, go ahead and log in.

5. McAfee Warning – CORRECT ANSWER: SCAM

  • Despite the fact that the scammers used McAfee’s logo, the real McAfee would never tell you to call support to remove viruses. This is an example of a scammer trying to get you to call them and pay them. Close the program, and run a FixMeStick scan.

6. The Department of Justice warning – CORRECT ANSWER: SCAM

  • This is a classic example of ransomware. No government agency will ever contact you through a pop up. If you see this message on your computer, NEVER pay – you won’t get your files back even if you do. Instead, run a FixMeStick scan right away!

7. The text message from Wells Fargo – CORRECT ANSWER: SCAM

 

  • Your bank is not likely to contact you via text message. Text message scams are just as dangerous as online ones. Don’t follow links that unknown numbers send to your phone, especially if they’re threatening. Delete the message immediately!
  • If you’re unsure, visit the website of your bank and contact them through there to double check.

Be sure to share this article with a friend so they learn the different between fake and real warnings!

37 comments

  1. Gillian - Reply

    Got the first question right, but could not read the second question as it was too small, I used the instructions you gave and got the magnifier, but then the print was blurry, so still could not read it. Also you did not give instructions on how to close the magnifier. I spent quite some time trying to figure that one out.

  2. Eilea - Reply

    An informative exercise. I know more than I thought about detecting real from fake it appears. We learn and learn.

  3. René - Reply

    The one question that I missed (erred in) was understandable because I would have not had that incident in my case/realm – but, I still answered wrong =(

  4. Anonymous - Reply

    I have one of these show up on my Computer so I bought the FixMeStick and it has not removed the scam which pops up I thought FixMeStick would remove it from my Computer I guess I am wrong as it popped up just after FixMeStick ended

    • Keegan Anfield - Reply

      Sorry to hear you’re still having issues. We offer a virus removal guarantee. If you could email us or chat with us on our website we’ll look into this for you and make sure this annoying pop up stops.

  5. Marilyn - Reply

    I missed one, but I already know my bank will not text me about a problem. If I get something like that, I forward it to their “phishing” site to report the problem. I have my trusted numbers to call, and don’t answer any numbers I don’t recognize. My motto in the last couple of years is: Trust No One!

    • Keegan Anfield - Reply

      You can never be too careful Marilyn. Good to know you’re aware of the scams out there.

  6. George - Reply

    Excellent score even if I do say so myself, followed you instructions about zooming in on the quiz questions and everything went well

  7. Pamela R George - Reply

    I couldn’t magnify! But looking at the “answers” was helpful. I knew the first one because it happened to me last year and cost me a computer! Dummy me. They tried again last week and I turned off power asap and stayed off the computer for a while.

  8. Keith Spence - Reply

    I enjoyed that quiz come test. I got 100% But I had to really check the Facebook question for traps.
    It just seemed wrong somehow but was correct in all its details.

    Lets have more of this kind of testing, its a good thing to keep us all on the ball.

    • Keegan Anfield - Reply

      Hi Keith! Great job, glad you liked it! We’ll be sure to do more of these.

  9. Mike - Reply

    I NEVER use facebook so any notification from them would be deleted immediately so I really got them all correct for how I use a computer

  10. Regina Showell - Reply

    The one error that I had was because I didn’t follow your instructions re enlarging the print. However, I still have the Microsoft scam popping up on computer even though I followed instructions sent to me via Vipre. Would you have any advice as opposed to closing the internet each time? Thanks for the quiz, by the way.

    • Keegan Anfield - Reply

      Hey Regina, you’re welcome for the quiz. We’ll be sure to do more of these. As for your pop up, send us an email or chat with us online to explain the issue and I’m sure we’ll be able to help!

  11. Lilly - Reply

    Is there something like this of my iPhone and iPad? I keep getting a pop up for congratulations for $1,000 for Amazon
    It would be nice to have a fix me stick for my iOS products.
    Thank you, mslilly

  12. Yvette Spicer - Reply

    I got 7 out of 7 … most of the companies portrayed will NOT contact you by popup or email. I’ve gotten quite a few bank scams in the past, but I don’t bank at the ones mentioned = scam … I look up the banks security and forward them the message so they can catch them. It does work! I haven’t had a bank scam message in a long time.

  13. Joseph - Reply

    I’m a bit paranoid so it gives me an edge. I have the newest McAfee and because I don’t know much about computers a McAfee tech set the program up for me. I’m not on twitter, Facebook or any social media site. Microsoft doesn’t give you a number to call, and I would also check out the number before calling. I don’t use chrome but the screen looks a lot like McAfee’s warning screen. They are telling you not to go to a site, can’t cause trouble that way. I have never typed a credit card number into my computer contacted me by computer I called them and blew a fit. They only made that mistake once in twenty years. The McAfee scam uses the wrong phone number. The computer is locked doesn’t have the proper DOJ logo. If you power down as soon as you see that thing you can stop it in it’s tracks. The one from Wells Fargo you should check the number and they are using the first 4 numbers there are about 100 billion cards with that number. That’s the reason credit card companies always use the last 4 numbers.

  14. Edith MacAllister - Reply

    Enjoyed the test, learned something new in the reasons, and surprised myself by getting all correct. Look forward to another one.

    • Keegan Anfield - Reply

      Great job Edith! Thanks for the feedback. We’ll be sure to do more quizzes.

  15. Sharon C. - Reply

    I’m with Gillian on this. I couldn’t read the message and even I thought it was a scam, I accepted it for the quiz. I did not know those instructions about the magnifier was for us…. that’s how technically inclined I am. If it really was sent to me I would have just deleted it. Thank you for the quiz.

    • FixMeStick - Reply

      Hey there Sharon! Sorry again for the print, glad you enjoyed our quiz regardless.

    • Keegan Anfield - Reply

      Good try! Hopefully you can learn from it to be more prepared in the future.

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